Savarkar, a man of many firsts.

Vinayak Savarkar (28 May 1883 – 26 Feb 1966) was an Indian pro-Independence activist. He was also an atheist, humanist, politician, poet, and the founding father of Hindutva. He authored a number of political works that were instrumental to negotiating in the minds of masses of Indians, India’s complete independence from Britain. There is little known about Savarkar in mainstream academia, because of the vicious propaganda against him. He was staunchly opposed by the colonial British authorities, and there was public antipathy between him and Congress for most of his political career.

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“Religion is a …

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“Religion is a mighty motive force. So is rapine. But where religion is goaded on by rapine and rapine serves as a handmaid to religion, the propelling force that is generated by these together is only equalled by the profoundity of human misery and devastation they leave behind them in their march. Heaven and hell making a common cause-such were the forces, overwhelmingly furious, that took India by surprise the day Mohammad crossed the Indus and invaded her” ~ V. D. Savarkar.

Tweet Mosaic: Internet Hindu thoughts on Bharat, Hindutva and Hinduism (6).

Tweet Mosaic: Internet Hindu thoughts on Bharat, Hindutva and Hinduism (6).

©2013. Secular African Society. All Rights Reserved

What Fuels Hindutva Phobia…?

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Tweet Mosaic: Internet Hindu thoughts on Bharat, Hindutva and Hinduism (5).

Tweet Mosaic: Internet Hindu thoughts on Bharat, Hindutva and Hinduism (5).

©2013. Secular African Society. All Rights Reserved

On Anti-Hindutvavadi-ism-isms.

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Tweet Mosaic: Internet Hindu thoughts on Bharat, Hindutva and Hinduism (4).

Tweet Mosaic: Internet Hindu thoughts on Bharat, Hindutva and Hinduism (4).

©2013. Secular African Society. All Rights Reserved

On Opposing Islamism With Hindutva…

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Tweet Mosaic: Internet Hindu thoughts on Bharat, Hindutva and Hinduism (3).

Tweet Mosaic: Internet Hindu thoughts on Bharat, Hindutva and Hinduism (3).

©2013. Secular African Society. All Rights Reserved

Is Hindutva Just Another Religion Politicised?

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Tweet Mosaic: Internet Hindu thoughts on Bharat, Hindutva and Hinduism (1)

Tweet Mosaic: Internet Hindu thoughts on Bharat, Hindutva and Hinduism (1)

©2013. Secular African Society. All Rights Reserved

In a quest to develop a secular democratic framework for human development across the globe, we’ve been researching philosophies originating from civilisations outside of the Western world. We’ve found India (or Bharat, which is its indigenous name) to be an enchanting and truly vibrant case study. At its height – before it was invaded by British mercenaries, invaded by Islamic jihadists and even before then, before it was named ‘Hindustan’ by Arabs and Persians – India was one of the world’s top civilisations with significant achievements in science, mathematics, literature, philosophy, medicine, astronomy and architecture. Hindus also adhered to highly ethical conducts when organising society, and in warfare. Their neighbours to the East in China and to the West in Arabia found them to be relatively humane and tolerant in the way they conducted themselves.

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Introducing Hindutva.

Introducing Hindutva.

©2013. Secular African Society. All Rights Reserved

Truth is One, Sages Call it by Many Names, and The Whole Universe is one Family” ~ Hindutva ethos.

If one called Hindutva a Third World’s cry to emancipate itself from the preying snares of foreign invaders, foreign rule, and charity industrialism; that analysis would be anything but sophist. Moreso, that analysis would be correct. If Secularism is the antidote to religious cultural imperialism and inequality, Hindutva is India’s antidote to the fading dream of self-pride, a Uniform Code for All and self-reliance.

Hindutva is a much welcome and progressive nationalist ideology for India. One which Naipaul lauds in the face of critics, as a ‘corrective to the past’ and a ‘broader civilisational resurgence’. Prior to the early 20th century, Hindutva was non-existent. Its birth was the doing of systematic aggression. Its announcement to the world was purely in resistance to unfettered abuse and oppression.

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