Awolowo vs Achebe: “We Remember Differently” ~ By Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie.

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The Bank Notes of Biafra

We recently began an academic exposé on secularism in Africa. A recommended case for  the secular studies in Africa is Nigeria. Nigeria officially emerged at the dawn of the 60s as an independent nation, after decades of being administered as a British colony. In 1967, a civil war broke out between the nation and its Eastern region. The region was seeking secession. The Eastern region was the indigenous homeland of the Igbo ethnic group and sub groups. They had established a country on their indigenous part of the country, and named it Biafra. The country had ministries, a civil service sector and a bank. There is a lot written about the war already, although the Biafran struggle is not given due attention in the secular studies. In Ahiara Declaration, the Biafrans identified their cause as a Black self-determination struggle against racism, White economic imperialism and Arab-Muslim expansionism. One of the first things Biafrans did upon establishing their country was to create a bank. In the piece below, the author examines the bank notes of Biafra. We have included pictures to the vital reading, to facilitate a visual understanding. The author also covers the financial challenges that the nascent nation faced during the course of the war, when Biafrans fought for their self-determination while being totally blockaded and ferociously bombed by the Nigerian army.

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From Giant of Africa to Give Me Oduduwa Or Let Me Die

From Giant of Africa to Give Me Oduduwa Or Let Me Die

There is a saying that goes thus: Nigeria is not a country but a continent.

Nigeria is a continent consisting of multiple and often times contrasting nations with conflicting national ideologies. It is a nation with over 250 ethnic groups, has the largest economy in Africa and is largely termed the Giant of Africa. As resounding and roaring as the title Giant of Africa sounds, it irrefutably is just that – a mere title. It is a title that sanitises the British Empire’s failed experiment. It is a title that exonerates the Native’s conscience from the indictment of genocide against the fellow Native. It is a conceited and fraudulent risible title that honours not indigenous identity thus can only proceed without honour for the self. Ancestral pride succumbs, that the shame of pretentious grandeur may prevail. Giant of Africa is a title that does not reflect the realities on ground for the present day common men or women, who live feed and walk like ants in a country allegedly inhabited by ‘giants’!

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Is it possible …

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Is it possible that a mass is improved by the improvement of only one part?

“Human kind is made up of two sexes, women and men. Is it possible that a mass is improved by the improvement of only one part and the other part is ignored? Is it possible that if half of a mass is tied to the earth with chains the other half can soar into the skies?”
Mustafa Kemal Atatürk

 

©2014. Secular African Society. All Rights Reserved.

My people are g…

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My people are going to learn the principles of democracy.

“My people are going to learn the principles of democracy the dictates of truth and the teachings of science. Superstition must go. Let them worship as they will, every man can follow his own conscience provided it does not interfere with sane reason or bid him act against the liberty of his fellow men.”
Mustafa Kemal Atatürk

 

©2014. Secular African Society. All Rights Reserved.

Those who use r…

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Those who use religion for their own benefit are detestable.

“Those who use religion for their own benefit are detestable. We are against such a situation and will not allow it. Those who use religion in such a manner have fooled our people; it is against just such people that we have fought and will continue to fight.”
Mustafa Kemal Atatürk

©2014. Secular African Society. All Rights Reserved.

Energy Deprivation and the Intra-gender Approach to Global Feminism (Part 1).

Energy Deprivation and the Intra-gender Approach to Global Feminism (Part 1).

 ©2014. Secular African Society. All Rights Reserved.

Introduction

International Women’s Day began as an initiative to honour working class women. Over a century later, and working class women the world over still face systematic marginalization. Although women perform 66% of the world’s labour, they receive only 11% of the world’s income and own just 1% of the world’s land. However the sheer magnitude of marginalization, it is a marginalization that is more prevalent in some regions of the world than in others. Far too frequently, the feminist struggles of working class women in developing regions of the world go unacknowledged. Working class women in Sub-Saharan Africa for instance, continue day after day with their marginalised realities neither recognised nor honoured. How? Firstly, women in post-conflict West Africa continue to suffer violence at alarming levels and with shocking frequency. Conflicts posed by political instability and ideological disputes are prevalent in developing regions, with Sub-Saharan Africa having its fair share. As a result, Sub-Saharan Africa’s women struggle with a myriad of critical needs ranging from achieving total independence as adults, to overcoming harrowing security struggles. To recall the words of English writer and political activist George Monbiot, “If wealth was the inevitable result of hard work and enterpriseevery woman in Africa would be a millionaire“. The question is not whether these women are deserving of their full rights as humans, but whether the forces that work against women’s empowerment are willing to let them enjoy their full rights as humans. Women from Sub-Saharan Africa have been relegated to the back of global women’s socio-eco-political bus.

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