The Ahiara Declaration: The Principles of the Biafran Revolution

THE

 AHIARA DECLARATION

 (The Principles of the Biafran Revolution)

 by

 EMEKA OJUKWU

General of the People’s Army

____________________

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION……………………………………………………………………………………………1

THE STRUGGLE…………………………………………………………………………………………….2

THE MYTH ABOUT THE NEGRO…………………………………………………………………………7 Continue reading

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The Bank Notes of Biafra

We recently began an academic exposé on secularism in Africa. A recommended case for  the secular studies in Africa is Nigeria. Nigeria officially emerged at the dawn of the 60s as an independent nation, after decades of being administered as a British colony. In 1967, a civil war broke out between the nation and its Eastern region. The region was seeking secession. The Eastern region was the indigenous homeland of the Igbo ethnic group and sub groups. They had established a country on their indigenous part of the country, and named it Biafra. The country had ministries, a civil service sector and a bank. There is a lot written about the war already, although the Biafran struggle is not given due attention in the secular studies. In Ahiara Declaration, the Biafrans identified their cause as a Black self-determination struggle against racism, White economic imperialism and Arab-Muslim expansionism. One of the first things Biafrans did upon establishing their country was to create a bank. In the piece below, the author examines the bank notes of Biafra. We have included pictures to the vital reading, to facilitate a visual understanding. The author also covers the financial challenges that the nascent nation faced during the course of the war, when Biafrans fought for their self-determination while being totally blockaded and ferociously bombed by the Nigerian army.

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From Giant of Africa to Give Me Oduduwa Or Let Me Die

From Giant of Africa to Give Me Oduduwa Or Let Me Die

There is a saying that goes thus: Nigeria is not a country but a continent.

Nigeria is a continent consisting of multiple and often times contrasting nations with conflicting national ideologies. It is a nation with over 250 ethnic groups, has the largest economy in Africa and is largely termed the Giant of Africa. As resounding and roaring as the title Giant of Africa sounds, it irrefutably is just that – a mere title. It is a title that sanitises the British Empire’s failed experiment. It is a title that exonerates the Native’s conscience from the indictment of genocide against the fellow Native. It is a conceited and fraudulent risible title that honours not indigenous identity thus can only proceed without honour for the self. Ancestral pride succumbs, that the shame of pretentious grandeur may prevail. Giant of Africa is a title that does not reflect the realities on ground for the present day common men or women, who live feed and walk like ants in a country allegedly inhabited by ‘giants’!

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Comparative Digest [2] Black Enslavement: Arab and European Compared.

Presented below is the second in a three part comparative digest series in which Nigerian author (from the Pan-African school of thought) Chinweizu discusses African historic relations with Arabs and Europeans, across three strands – ‘Racism’, ‘Enslavement of Blacks’ and ‘Colonialism’. He argues that for almost every key aspect of European racism against Blacks in history, there was an Arab/Islamic counterpart that was just as brutal when it wasn’t worse. The comparative digest is recommended literature in understanding colonial injustices committed against Africans, not from the perspective of a single story, as is so often erroneously the case, but rather told as it should be – taking into account, both European and Arab/Islamic atrocities. The colonial crimes committed by Arabs, against Africans, through Islam, very often go unchecked and unspoken under the guise of political correctness and avoidance of offending religious sentiments. Rather recently, Nigerian Islamists Boko Haram successfully pushed their insurgency into the heart of the nation’s capital, when they killed yet more innocent people in a bomb blast (as has become the weekly norm), all in the name of re-establishing a lost Empire that was in the first place introduced to the Natives through brutal colonialism. What’s worse, this insurgency shows no sign of receding. While local resistance to the ideology behind the political, colonialist and inevitably racist movement shows no sign of improving! South Sudan split ways with Sudan, after having endured a brutal civil war that claimed 2 million lives and displaced more than twice as many. Today, Sudan (the North) having emerged from that war, no longer considers itself an African nation, rather calls itself Arab – just like its Palestinian brothers, Libyans, many Somalis to the East and Egyptians to the North. Never mind that no single Arab people have in all of history, ever given up their identity to assume an indigenous African one. This is the mechanism of Arabisation in Africa – native lands are stripped from indigenous hands and transferred to Arab custody. The Arabisation of Africa began with the introduction of Islam to Africans. It has in the past, and continues till this very day, to legitimise racism, slavery and colonialism in Arab societies, but on the African continent. It does this against African converts to Islam (in Mauritania and Sudan for example) and against the even more impure disbelieving Africans. As Armenian president Sarkisian said recently regarding the Ottoman empire’s cleansing of Armenians:  “The denial of a crime constitutes the direct continuation of that very crime. Only recognition and condemnation can prevent the repetition of such crimes in the future”. Of a truth, injustice unspoken is injustice awaiting resurgence! Society is indeed on a slippery slope when religious sentiments are cocooned even at the expense of ensuring dignity of human life.

Republished with permission. ©2014. Secular African Society. All Rights Reserved.

 By Chinweizu © Chinweizu 2007

In the words of Bernard Lewis: “In the horrors of the abduction of Africans from their homes for delivery to Islamic and American purchasers,

there was little to choose, . . . . Nor was there much difference in the dangers and hardships of the journey, until the human merchandise reached its ultimate destination across ocean or desert.” [Lewis Race and Slavery in the Middle East, p. 100]

Comparative Digest [1] Racism: Arab and European Compared.

Presented below is one part of a three part comparative digest series in which Nigerian author (from the Pan-African school of thought) Chinweizu discusses African historic relations with Arabs and Europeans, across three strands – ‘Racism’, ‘Enslavement of Blacks’ and ‘Colonialism’. He argues that for almost every key aspect of European racism against Blacks in history, there was an Arab/Islamic counterpart that was just as brutal when it wasn’t worse. The comparative digest is recommended literature in understanding colonial injustices committed against Africans, not from the perspective of a single story, as is so often erroneously the case, but rather told as it should be – taking into account, both European and Arab/Islamic atrocities. The colonial crimes committed by Arabs, against Africans, through Islam, very often go unchecked and unspoken under the guise of political correctness and avoidance of offending religious sentiments. Rather recently, Nigerian Islamists Boko Haram successfully pushed their insurgency into the heart of the nation’s capital, when they killed yet more innocent people in a bomb blast (as has become the weekly norm), all in the name of re-establishing a lost Empire that was in the first place introduced to the Natives through brutal colonialism. What’s worse, this insurgency shows no sign of receding. While local resistance to the ideology behind the political, colonialist and inevitably racist movement shows no sign of improving! South Sudan split ways with Sudan, after having endured a brutal civil war that claimed 2 million lives and displaced more than twice as many. Today, Sudan (the North) having emerged from that war, no longer considers itself an African nation, rather calls itself Arab – just like its Palestinian brothers, Libyans, many Somalis to the East and Egyptians to the North. Never mind that no single Arab people have in all of history, ever given up their identity to assume an indigenous African one. This is the mechanism of Arabisation in Africa – native lands are stripped from indigenous hands and transferred to Arab custody. The Arabisation of Africa began with the introduction of Islam to Africans. It has in the past, and continues till this very day, to legitimise racism, slavery and colonialism in Arab societies, but on the African continent. It does this against African converts to Islam (in Mauritania and Sudan for example) and against the even more impure disbelieving Africans. As Armenian president Sarkisian said recently regarding the Ottoman empire’s cleansing of Armenians:  “The denial of a crime constitutes the direct continuation of that very crime. Only recognition and condemnation can prevent the repetition of such crimes in the future”. Of a truth, injustice unspoken is injustice awaiting resurgence! Society is indeed on a slippery slope when religious sentiments are cocooned even at the expense of ensuring dignity of human life.

Republished with permission. ©2014. Secular African Society. All Rights Reserved.

 By Chinweizu © Chinweizu 2007

Concerning the lands of Islam in the Middle East, there is “the conventional picture of a society totally free from racial prejudice and discrimination.” This is “the false picture drawn by the myth makers.”—[Bernard Lewis, Race and Slavery in the Middle East, p.99]
Below is a digest of some of the evidence on the matter.

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