Sex-Slavery in Islamic Jurisprudence

Sex-Slavery in Islamic Jurisprudence

©2013. Secular African Society. All Rights Reserved.

Ever heard the saying: “Islam is a perfect religion, it’s Muslims who aren’t perfect”?

Well that is a thoughtfully concocted and sinister deflective tactic designed to acquit Islam of its inherent fascism, while fermenting a discontent for Muslims in academia.

Far from perfect, Islam is fundamentally flawed down to its prophetic traditions. Slavery is one of the most revered divine privileges in Islam. It is not illegal in Islam, rather it is an Islamic right. Muhammad inaugrated a tripartite model of slavery into Islam, encompassing enslavement, slave trade and sex-slavery. It was an enslavement model that thrived unquestioned until the dismantling of the Ottoman empire.

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Muslim Resistance to the Abolition of Slavery in the Islamic Empire.

Muslim Resistance to the Abolition of Slavery in the Islamic Empire.

As the European colonial era approached its end, Western forces sought even more to abolish norms that were inconsistent with the UDHR charter. One of such norms, prevalent in many societies for millennia, was slavery. The Islamic empire was the largest empire pre the rise of the West. In Islamic societies, a tripartite model of slavery, inaugurated into Islam by Prophet Muhammad fully thrived. It encompassed domestic enslavement, chattel slavery and slave concubinage. It was Prophet Muhammad himself who personally inaugurated wholesale enslavement of disbelievers for selling or engaging in concubinage and household work. He very well freed some slaves as an exemplary act of goodwill, but he enslaved many more. Prophet Muhammad certified slave trade when he sold his enslaved Banu Qurayza (Jewish) captive women to Najd for acquiring weapons and horses, while forbidding anyone from enslaving the born Muslim. Muslim apologists often argue that Prophet Muhammad never really endorsed slavery, but merely allowed it since it was already prevalent in pre-Islamic Arabia. They then refer to the fact that Muhammad also preached manumission to his followers, and personally freed slaves himself, as a testament to the aforementioned premise. The fact of the matter however is that slavery of the vanquished infidels was an integral component of the Islamic empire’s booming economy. Slave trade remained a vital source of wealth in the Islamic world throughout the reigns of the Rightly Guided Caliphs (632-60), the Umayyads (661-750) and the Abbasids Continue reading

Universal Declaration of Rights for Ideologies.

The modified declaration of the Human Rights Charter below is not an attempt to mock the inherent fascism in absolute religiosity. It is chiefly an attempt to aid both the human rights amateur (religious and irreligious)  and the unquestioning non-Muslim, in understanding the stark implications and legislative practicalities of the supremacy of religious (Islamic) ideology. How is the Islamic religion different from other religions? Islam is the only religion known to man that seeks total pre-eminence over the personal, spiritual, social and political affairs of the living – whether the living be Muslim or non-Muslim. Through the course of centuries, the world’s biggest religion – Christianity – underwent series of Reformations to sway it from this intolerance affliction. Inherent to the precepts of Islam is the expansionist notion that the Islamic ideology must be exalted over the affairs of man everywhere, to the ends of the Earth and beyond into the great chasm of the universe. By divine law, Islam also reserves the right to militaristically pursue this outcome. While the accusation of inherent fascism does not apply to secular notions of religion (including Islam), it most certainly defines Theocratic notions of religion. It makes somewhat easier comparative reading, to be familiar with the original Universal Declaration of Human Rights Charter.

©2013. Secular African Society. All Rights Reserved.

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Secularism 101: What is Secularism?

Below is an article that proffers a definition of what Secularism is and differentiates it from what it isn’t. Secularism is often touted as a space purely for Atheistic congregation, but Secularism, in truth, does not merely mean freedom from religion. Secularism is both freedom from religion and freedom of religion. Secularism is important in any civilisation because it creates a space for both the religious and irreligious to relate in a common language that both understand. This space does not inevitably culminate in persecution – as the theocratic space does – just because one does not speak in the same tongue as another’s deity. While Secularism is respectful of pluralism, a Theocracy sees the world only through the authority and the lens of a chosen deity.

The piece below was written by a Nigerian Author Ify Otuya. It was reblogged from http://www.werunthings.net/secularism-101-what-is-secularism/

©2013. Secular African Society. All Rights Reserved.

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